Arthur Traveller, a white goods paint sprayer, was from the East end of London. Every year he would journey down to Chapel Porth on holiday and would bring his elderly mother with him as her carer. Arthur's mother would make wonderful bramble and apple crumble for Arthur and the local boys who would all gather together and share on the beach. 

Arthur and his mother came down each year without fail and for one or two weeks in the summer it would become a ritual for everyone to come together and enjoy belly boarding, the ocean and life on the beach.   

Arthur reached 60 years of age and his adoration for belly boarding and surf was stronger than ever. He would venture down to the water every day, come rain or shine, and the smile that lit up his face said it all. 

Arthur Traveller's passing was a shock to all who knew him. A truly kind and remarkable person, the first WBBC was organised by Martyn 'Turnip' Ward in 2003 and was initially called 'The King Arthur's Challenge'.

Sponsored by John Heath at Piran Surf, the event went down a storm, with belly boarders embracing Arthur's old style way of life and jumping into the ocean in traditional gear and surfing the waves in on their old belly boards. 

The event was held for the next few years, gaining more and more support and sponsorship as time went on from companies including Skinners Brewery. The King Arthur's Challenge was then renamed as 'The Skinners World Belly Board Championships' and continued to run with much success. 

However, in 2007 Martyn Ward and Chris Ryan realised the liability they had due to the interest they were receiving and the number of participants. Because of this, they decided that the event would be better held by the National Trust. Enquiries were made and the handover was a success with the National Trust delighted to be able to hold such an event. 

The National Trust continued to hold the event for a number of years, however more recently have decided to hand it back to its original founder. The local National Trust team that managed the event all play a crucial role in conserving and protecting 10 miles of coastline from St. Agnes to Godrevy. Set against the backdrop of the 2016 State of Nature report which found that one in six of Britain's wild species is at risk of vanishing, the conservation charity decided to focus their resources on work to improve these important and special sites for wildlife to thrive and for people to enjoy. 

For this reason Martyn Ward decided to take on the nostalgic event again, welcoming it back and this year plans to use its full potential and make it a fundraiser for the RNLI, the organisation that saves lives at sea. Teaming up with Trevornick at Holywell Bay, the event will now run over an entire weekend, 1st-2nd September 2018. It will feature live music and stalls following an old style theme, with Trevornick's excellent facilities hosting and the WBBC a stone's throw away on the beautiful Holywell Bay.

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